Blog Archives

The 9 Best Films About Suicide

Michael Haneke’s Trilogy: The Seventh Continent, Benny’s Video, 71 Fragments of a Chronology of Chance

The Ten Most Disturbing Films I Have Ever Seen

Foreign Films You Need To See That You Probably Haven’t!

Forgive me making assumptions in the title of this post, but the following”foreign” films (i.e., films that aren’t in English originally) are six that are not very widely seen. I’m not talking about big Kurosawa blockbusters or Bergman, but lesser known ones. But they all MUST be seen, if you can find them.

1: Dekalog (1988) (dir. Krzysztof Kieslowski)

This Polish masterpiece from the brilliant Krzysztof Kieslowski is probably his best film… if you can call it a film. It’s actually a series of ten hour long movies, totalling almost ten hours. They cover a wide range of emotions and scenarios, and together it is basically a representation of many of the dramas of life itself.

2: Night and Fog (1955) (dir. Alan Resnais)

Thirty minutes of starkly horrific, emotionally (and visually) graphic and extremely disturbing video and images of concentration camps, starvation, death and the discarding of millions of bodies and items might not sound appealing, but not only is this a must-see film, it’s an important film. Though you might feel sick or want to look away, it’s the same as ignoring the awful tragedies of our past as it is to miss out on an opportunity to see this film. It can be found on YouTube, in three parts; the first is below:

3: Shoah (1985) (dir. Claude Lanzmann)

The second Holocaust film on this list is my personal favourite. It is also substantially longer than 30 minutes; it’s 9 and a half hours. But believe me, it is worth every single minute. Unlike Night and Fog, it contains not a shred of imagery from the actual Holocaust times, but the pictures we do see are just as haunting, if not more so. We see where these atrocities happened, and as they look today. Seeing the places, a shiver runs down my spine. It’s a golden rule that so few horror movies (not that this is one) actually take heed of: what is implied is much scarier than what is seen. The more attractive part of the film is that it also contains various interviews with people both indirectly and directly involved in the massacre of the Jews, including a particularly memorable interview with a man who cut the hair of Jewish people. The interview starts off easy enough, but he quickly breaks down and is unable to answer. Shoah is a must-see film for anyone interested in this part of history, and it delivers what it promises in a manner I am forever thankful for.

4: The Hour of the Wolf (1968) (dir. Ingmar Bergman)

The closest to a real, terrifying horror film Ingmar Bergman ever directed is one of the surprisingly less-seen ones. The Hour of the Wolf has proved to be incredibly influential on modern horror (most notably Martin Scorsese’s Shutter Island) and remains in itself a constantly intriguing, frightening puzzle. Max von Sydow edges closer to insanity than ever as an imperfect world begins to fracture and sanity splits in half. All those movies about the protagonist with a multiple personality owe a hell of a lot to this one, which really kick-started them all.

5: I Stand Alone (1998) (dir. Gaspar Noé)

 

Most people, when they think of Gaspar Noé, think of Irreversible or Enter the Void, and so do I, I suppose, but a film of his that is often glossed over or disliked because of its darker themes of suicide and incest is actually very interesting and quite good. It takes a look into the soul, mind, and dying heart of a man, known as The Butcher, angry at the world and attempting to reconnect with his estranged daughter while fighting the demons inside him. Might sound clichéd if Hollywood were doing it, but it’s actually a very bleak, disturbing but affecting feature. The Butcher can be seen at the beginning of Irreversible, speaking a mantra that really stands for the suffocating isolation of his life and a mantra for which Noé has become known: “Time Destroys Everything.”

6: The Seventh Continent (1989), dir. Michael Haneke

Michael Haneke’s first cinematic feature film, and the first instalment in his brilliant Glaciation trilogy, is a must-see for any fan of Haneke. And yet, surprisingly, many of the Haneke fans I know have not seen it! His now immediately noticeable style of direction is present here as he chronicles the disturbing story of an entire family who mysteriously committed suicide. This is way up in my Top 5 from Haneke, and remains, like the more popular Caché and The Piano Teacher, a troubling look at the desperate, hidden truths of unhappy people.

So there you have it. Five great movies to add to your watchlist or queue. And I recommend adding them near the top. If you were disappointed with any of these fine movies, then I would be extremely surprised. They’re not all for everyone, but everyone should see them. If that makes sense.

Anything you’d like to say on the matter? Please, leave a comment below. Thanks.

Great Directors: Michael Haneke

Last night I watched Michael Haneke’s tremendous thriller, the mysterious and chilling The White Ribbon. It was Haneke doing what he does best, and it inspired me to write a post about this fantastic director, his lifetime and films.

He was born in Germany, and spent most of his life taking a keen interest in film and television. It wasn’t until middle-age that he finally began to direct feature films. His first was The Seventh Continent, based on the true story of a mass family suicide. It was the first of a trilogy of three followed by Benny’s Video and 71 Fragments of a Chronology of Chance, two more films examining violence in modern society. It was with his next film, however, that he proved he wasn’t squeamish to presenting violence in an unsettlingly honest manner. Funny Games was released in 1997, and seemed to be a plotless film about mindless serial violence, though Haneke has said he prefers to have the violence ‘implied’ rather than seen. He was intent on getting his point through, so much so that exactly ten years later he directed a shot-for-shot American remake starring Naomi Watts and Tim Roth.

The next movie, in 2000, was a character study, titled Code Unknown, starring Juliette Binoche and telling of a chain-reaction series of events. His next film, in 2001, was where he gained true fame (and notoriety). The Piano Teacher is a sexually graphic, violently suggestive and brutally stunning motion picture telling of sexual obsession and visceral self-harm. It won various awards, including Cannes Best Actor and Actress for its two leads, and sealed Haneke’s fate as a director of coldly beautiful movies with seedy underbellies.

He reteamed with the star of that film, Isabelle Huppert, for his next film, a post-apocalyptic vision called Time of the Wolf, made in France. The film was quite good, but noticeably less successful and screened at Cannes out of competition.

His next film is, in my opinion, his absolute unbeatable best. Caché (titled ‘Hidden’ in English) is his creepiest, slow-paced and most thought-provoking thriller. It tells of a couple (Daniel Auteuil and Juliette Binoche) who are uneasy and frightened after receiving videotapes of their house from a hidden camera that seems to be impossibly positioned. It asks countless questions about human secrets and how we react to dangerous situations, as well as featuring cinematography and direction that are, in no exaggeration or hyperbole, a serious work of masterful art.

After the Funny Games remake came the Cannes success The White Ribbon, the film which prompted this post. Haneke shoots in black-and-white this time, and tells a gripping tale of mysterious events in a wartime village. Various characters begin relationships, and everybody is a suspect for committing the serious crimes. The film is very reminiscent of the movies of Ingmar Bergman, filmed in an eerily similar style and with an eerily similar plot. Imagine Picnic at Hanging Rock meets Fanny and Alexander.

We are now eagerly awaiting the release of his newest film, Love, which I’ll be sure to see and review.

Leave a comment and tell me which Haneke films you’ve seen, and what you thought of them. You can see, from this amazing filmography, what a talented and brilliant director Haneke is, and I hope this will prompt you to check out any of his amazing films. He is one of few directors who, in my opinion, has never made a bad film. And that is quite something, indeed.

Thanks for reading.