Blog Archives

Unforgettable Scenes #1: “The biggest regret of my life… I let my love go.”

3 Movies I’m Looking Forward To in 2012

Paul Thomas Anderson Characters Who Deserve Their Own Movie!

50 Things I Love About Magnolia

Four months ago, I wrote a post detailing fifty things I love about the movie Magnolia (1999).  Just a few days ago, Stevee over at Cinematic Paradox wrote a similar post of things she loved about Inception (2010), which prompted me to revisit my old post and revise it. So without further ado, here is the first in a series of 50 Things I Love About… posts. And today’s movie is undeniably and unashamedly my favourite film ever made, Paul Thomas Anderson’s magnificent Magnolia (1999).

1: The first six minutes:

2: Exodus 8:2

3: The tracking shot in the TV studio.

4: Go to the card. Go to the fucking card.

5: John C. Reilly shining his flashlight into the camera; a shot which unexplainably makes me want to cry every time I see it.

6: Constantly wondering what Frank T.J. Mackey’s initials stand for.

7: What am I doing? I’m quietly judging you.

8: The fact that the numbers 82 appear over 100 times throughout the film.

9: The homage to Network.

10:

11: The fact that P.T.A. dared to make it three hours long, and not a second shorter.

12: The second of two fucking awesome Alfred Molina cameos in Paul Thomas Anderson movies.

13: Marcy, don’t drag that couch any further!

14: John C. Reilly’s gun falling from the sky.

15: What Do Kids Know?

16: P.T.A.’s skilful nod to Bertolucci’s Last Tango in Paris:

17: The use of Supertramp in the bar scene.

18: The casually obvious nods to Robert Altman.

19: 82% chance of Rain.

20: The extension of Aimee Mann’s three minute track “One” into about eight minutes.

21: It’s not what you hope for, it’s not what you wish for, it’s what you TAKE!

22: I used to be smart, but now I’m just stupid.

23: The stunningly epic score by Jon Brion, which simultaneously manages to be happy…

24: …sad…

25: …and epic!

26: The documentary “That Moment”

27: Do you still want the bread, water and peanut butter?

28: These strange things happen all the time.

29: I’ll tell you what the biggest regret of my life is…

…I let my love go:

30: The shape made by a coil of rope on the rooftop just before Sydney Barringer commits suicide.

31: Everyone singing along to Aimee Mann’s Wise Up.

32: The heartbreaking meltdowns shared by so many characters.

33: Philip Seymour Hoffman in his first role as a really likeable character.

34: John C. Reilly talking to himself in the police car.

35: Now that I’ve met you, would you object to never seeing me again?

36: Melora Walters smiling at the camera.

37: The track “So Now Then” (see #23)

38: Don’t you fucking call me lady!

39: Julianne Moore saying “Shut the fuck up!”

40: This happens. This is something that happens.

41: I really do have love to give. I just don’t know where to put it!

42: Julianne Moore’s meltdown in the pharmacy:

43: Thomas Jane’s unrecognizable cameo.

44: The fact that P.T.A. screened Lumet’s “Network” to the cast before production began.

45: I can NEVER get tired of this, considering I’ve watched it twenty times, and I could watch it twenty, thousand more.

46: There are so many incredible and stunningly subtle references in the film’s dialogue, framing, lighting, sound and set arrangement that it is impossible to count them all.

47: The film’s shocking and unexpected climax.

48: A lot of people think this is just a job you go to. Take a lunch hour, job’s over. But it’s a 24 hour deal. No two ways about it. And what most people don’t see is just how hard it is to do the right thing. People think if I make a judgment call, that that’s a judgment on them, but that is not what I do. And that’s not what should be done. I have to take everything and play it as it lays. Sometimes people need a little help. Sometimes people need to be forgiven. And sometimes they need to go to jail. And that’s a very tricky thing on my part… making that call. I mean, the law’s the law, and heck if I’m gonna break it. You can forgive someone… well, that’s the tough part. What can we forgive? Tough part of the job. Tough part of walking down the street.

49: The book says, “we may be through with the past, but the past ain’t through with us.”

50: “I think, for better or worse, that Magnolia is the best film I will ever make.” – Paul Thomas Anderson

The Five Best Characters Created by Paul Thomas Anderson

It’s Paul Thomas Anderson’s birthday today, so I’ve decided to honour the greatest living American film director (that’s right, I said it!) by presenting us with a look into his amazing mind and five crazy, unique characters that only he could have created.

1: Rahad Jackson, Boogie Nights (1997)

Even more astoundingly memorable than Mark Wahlberg’s Dirk Diggler or Burt Reynolds’s Jack Horner is Alfred Molina’s Rahad Jackson, who appears in only one scene, but one of the best scenes Anderson ever directed. His great tastes in American music and fiery rage with a gun are only two of the great reasons he’s on this list. Anderson created a character that any director or writer could easily have taken overboard, but has the right amount of great comedic value and genuinely chilling attitude.

2: Officer Jim Kurring, Magnolia (1999)

A warm source of naive empathy and contrasting experienced wisdom that is naturally necessary for a film like this, John C. Reilly delivers perhaps the most convicted and developed performance of his career as a young cop who falls in love with a drug addict, just one of various storylines in Anderson’s epic Boogie Nights follow-up. Delivering empowered Cops-style monologues to an imagined camera, and suffering for his job in the name of a God he’s forced to believe in following the death of his wife, Kurring is one of the most easily relatable and intricately accurate portrayals of hilarious naivety and saddening realization. Tough part of the job. Tough part of walking down the street.

3: Frank T.J. Mackey, Magnolia (1999)

In a brilliant film like Magnolia with so many characters, it’s easy to pick more than one and so here is another: an Oscar-nominated performance from a surprisingly excellent Tom Cruise as one of the most basically complex characters in the Anderson universe. Mackey is a man who is easy to despise. But he, like many of us, has been hurt, his life changed forever, by cruelty. He’s more of a victim than he is a perpetrator, and misogynistic or not, he’s a broken, unmended man, and Anderson has captured that perfectly.

4: Barry Egan, Punch-Drunk Love (2002)

It just goes to show that Paul Thomas Anderson can get a brilliant Oscar-worthy performance out of an acting failure like Adam Sandler. His performance as Egan is multilayered and filled with mental complexity, but he is written so brilliantly, so excellently, that it is easy for Sandler to rip his teeth into it and shine in the role he was born for.

5: Daniel Plainview, There Will Be Blood (2007)

Daniel Day-Lewis gives one of the best acting performances of all time in a stunning role as a man consumed by greed and sin, a man on whose face we see nothing but unrelenting age, and in whose eyes we see only brutal, unflinching hatred. I look at people and see nothing worth liking, says Plainview, and it is one of many chilling observations that are windows into the soul of a truly evil man. Sure, Day-Lewis brought him to life, but Anderson conceived him, and without him, we’d be without one of the most formidable, terrifying villains of all time, beating the hell out of Hannibal Lecter or Norman Bates by miles.

Happy Birthday, Mr. Anderson, and hopefully with The Master, there’ll be yet another character/s to add to the list.

Very Long Movies I Can Watch Over and Over Again…

Believe me, I LOVE a good historical epic. Love ’em a lot. But most of them are films you can enthusiastically watch once, and never return to again. This is the case with a lot of ’em, and a lot of other assorted ‘long’ movies, but there are a special selection of movies that are AT LEAST 3 hours long that I can watch over and over and over, and possibly never get tired of them. And here they are, in order of how many times I’ve seen them.

The Best of Youth (2003)

This high-spirited, epic Italian drama is a literal lifetime spread out through six hours of pure bliss. Please do not be turned off by the runtime; this is a brilliant, insanely watchable and gripping family drama; to quote Roger Ebert: “The film is six hours long but it is also six hours deep.” An unforgettable film I will never regret watching. View Count: 1, but I plan to buy it soon and then watch it over and over.

Dekalog (1988)

I know it’s going too far to call this “the best movie of all time.” That’s an impossible statement to make, so I’m not going to venture to make it, but Krzysztof Kieslowski’s 10-hour Dekalog (conveniently sliced into ten equal pieces) is pretty damn close. It deals with pretty much all the themes, emotions and basic crises of the human condition, and it does so beautifully. A masterful, must-see epic, if ever there was one. Read my review. View Count: 1 (Be fair! I only saw it for the first time a month ago!)

Shoah (1985)

Though there is dispute whether this is a documentary or a film, Claude Lanzmann’s Shoah is the most powerful, full, emotionally visceral film about the Holocaust ever made. At a whopping nine hours, some will undoubtedly be bored, but Lanzmann’s movie is, for me, anything but boring. He provides interviews with those both directly and indirectly involved in the mass murder of the Jews, and provides haunting looks at some of the places these atrocities occured. Chilling; epic; a masterpiece. View Count: 2.

Fanny and Alexander (1983)

Ingmar Bergman’s magnificent 3-hour (or 5-hour, depending on which version you’re watching) masterwork is a brilliant, beautiful, astounding work of art. Sven Nykvist’s cinematography makes every image look like a fantastic, colourful painting, beautifully directed by an amazing Bergman at the height (and end) of his theatrical career. Jeez, I’m running out of adjectives. View Count: 2

Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

Of all the brilliant epics David Lean directed, the only one that really hooked me and made me fall in love with it was Lawrence of Arabia. Crossing the 3 and a half hour mark, it may be long, but it sure is beautiful. The stunning images of the Sahara Desert combined with the sheer will of Peter O’Toole’s T.E. Lawrence combine to make a fantastic, riveting movie. View Count: 2.

Dogville (2003)

Lars von Trier has made many films that have very divided opinion, and the one with the most divided is probably Dogville. It seems half the audience hate this fantastic 3-hour drama about social mistreatment, cruelty, and the ultimate price of letting everything go. If you’ve seen it, then make sure you visit this page and leave a comment rating it out of 10 by June 24, 2011. Anyway, it’s a fantastic (but debatable) movie that I absolutely love. View Count: 3.

Barry Lyndon (1975)

Stanley Kubrick’s longest film is actually 3 hours long, and often forgotten about when Kubrick’s name and filmography is mentioned. However, it is one of his best films, a fantastic epic about the lifetime of a young man (Ryan O’Neal) who ascends to royalty in the 19th century by fighting and cheating his way to the top. Beautifully lit, this scenically marvellous and emotionally riveting (particularly within the gripping last hour) film is sadly underrated. View Count: 4.

The Godfather, Parts I and II (1972, 1974)

Both of these films, which together total over six hours, are absolutely enthralling, brilliant masterpieces from Francis Ford Coppola that revolutionized and revitalized a mafia/crime drama genre, undoubtedly inspiring such classic directors as Martin Scorsese and Brian DePalma. Not to mention I can watch them over and over and over without ever getting tired. View Count: 6.

Inland Empire (2006)

I seem to be the only person who loves this movie enough to say it is perfect. David Lynch’s 3-hour masterpiece is a very inaccessible but still hugely enthralling delve into the unusual, darker side of humanity. A seemingly senseless, plotless series of scenes, Inland Empire actually has a bustling, multi-layered plot which is extremely difficult to decode, probably the reason I’ve watched it so many times. It’s really a film that needs to be seen to be believed, and I don’t like to throw that phrase around. View Count: 8.

Magnolia (1999)

If you read my blog you probably know this is my favourite movie of all time, and that is fair enough reason to watch it 19 times. That’s right, NINETEEN! I’ve watched this 187 minute labyrinth of emotions almost twenty times in its entirety, and I never, never, NEVER get tired of it. I’ve written a very long essay on it (which I plan to post to the site soon enough, pending further editing), and forced friends to watch it more times than they care for. Even if you don’t love this movie, as I’m certainly not expecting you to, you have to admit it has serious emotional power, and it is a testament to the brutal, strong ability of Paul Thomas Anderson, a man who was BORN to be behind the camera. Affects me in the same manner each and every time, and was arguably the film that fuelled my love for cinema. View Count: 19.

What are some awfully long movies you love to watch? What about ones you think are too long? Not long enough? Seen any of the movies above and have something you’d like to say? Leave a comment below. Thanks for reading.

The A-Z of Movie Directors

Or more specifically, my A-Z of movie directors. Everyone has their own, and I invite everyone to share theirs. Although you can probably guess, it’s a list of directors sorted alphabetically, with one director for each letter of the alphabet, for example, the letter A could be Akira Kurosawa or Paul Thomas Anderson, depending on whether you choose to sort alphabetically by the first letter of the first name or the last name. Either one is optional, you don’t have to restrict it to using the first letter of the surname.

Anyway, here’s my list.

A

Paul Thomas Anderson: The greatest living American director today, Paul Thomas Anderson has consistently served excellent films about the human condition, live in the San Fernando Valley and character studies.

Best Movie: There Will Be Blood (2007)

B

Ingmar Bergman: The king of European cinema, the late Ingmar Bergman was a man who knew everything about cinema, and made films that covered various excellent moments in human life, confronting topics such as religion, sexuality and human relationships.

Best Movie: Persona (1966)

C

Francis Ford Coppola: In the 70s, at least, this dedicated man went through Hell (from the time constraints of The Godfather making to the infamous tragedies of the Apocalypse Now shoot) to make some great movies and cannot be ignored.

Best Movie: The Godfather (1972)

D

Darren Aronofsky: A man whose knowledge of cinema has resulted in some moving, horrifying images put to screen, Aronofsky tests the limits of film and uses his strong filming tactics to create original, studied pieces.

Best Film: Requiem for a Dream (2000)

E

Edgar Wright: From fast-paced, extra-extreme editing, to quick cuts, witty humour delivered with notable velocity and film reference after countless film reference, it’s nice to have a fresh British take on modern comedy.

Best Movie: Shaun of the Dead (2004)

F

David Fincher: A director whose understanding of the foundations of a decent thriller and whose analysis of human behaviour is fascinatingly key, Fincher has presented us with his own fresh outlook on darker societies.

Best Movie: Fight Club (1999)

G

Vincent Gallo: A doubtful and surprising choice, I know, but this man deserves his place here for his simple cleverness and accuracy in either comedy (Buffalo ’66) or deep-seated tragic drama (The Brown Bunny). An interesting, misunderstood man.

Best Movie: Buffalo ’66 (1998)

H

Alfred Hitchcock: One of the founders of action thriller, Hitchcock has managed to, time after, time, produce interesting, thought-provoking thrillers, and earned his name among the best of Hollywood’s directors.

Best Movie: Rear Window (1954)

I

Alejandro Gonzalez Iñàrritu: A Mexican film director whose movies examine racism, prejudice, coincidence, chance and human connections unlike any others, Iñàrritu is a man who knows what he films, and makes strong, beautiful movies.

Best Movie: Amores Perros (2000)

J

Joel Coen: One of a duet of extremely talented brothers, Joel Coen and Ethan Coen have consistenly and regularly produced interesting, often hilarious, always moving movies that have taken their place in great movie history.

Best Movie: Fargo (1996)

K

Krzysztof Kieslowski: Though the man only made four movies (and one ten hour movie split into ten “episodes”), those films are beautiful, masterful films of exploration and deep meaning about humanity. His premature death is a sadness, but his films live on.

Best Movie: Three Colours: Red (1994)

L

David Lynch: Probably the most original film director in Hollywood at the moment, Lynch is a man who can formulate mammoth, confusing tales, and decorate them with his original, unique and poignant outlook on life, America and humanity. A fantastic, strange man.

Best Movie: Mulholland Dr. (2001)

M

Michael Haneke: A fantastic director whose techniques involving violence and sex are unique, clever and smart. Read my full article about his career here.

Best Movie: Cachè (2005)

N

Christopher Nolan: Reinventor of the Batman franchise and director of twisting, unbelievable films, Christopher Nolan is a man whose vast knowledge and superior opinions of use involving special effects is mind-boggling. His films are accurate, yet will always be questionable in the annals of film discussion.

Best Movie: Memento (2000)

O

Orson Welles: From Citizen Kane to The Muppet Movie, Orson Welles is a man who dominates the screen with his presence, as well as his inventive imagination and timeless visionary representations of life and living.

Best Movie: Citizen Kane (1941)

P

Alexander Payne: An offbeat filmmaker whose indie gems are held in high consideration among others, Alexander Payne’s films are clever, interesting and fun to watch.

Best Movie: Sideways (2004)

Q

Quentin Tarantino: A man whose movies excel in glorious violence, subtle humour and beautifully written and choreographed scenes of fantastic acting, Quentin Tarantino’s movies have become famous for their awesomeness.

Best Movie: Pulp Fiction (1994)

R

Robert Altman: From the annoying yet cinematically awesome touch of overlapping dialogue, to the true cleverness into which he weaves the tales of various characters, Altman’s films are brilliant works of art.

Best Movie: Short Cuts

S

Martin Scorsese: The King of comedy… and gangster movies, character studies, psychological thrillers, street dramas and others, Scorsese is a powerful presence among all cinematic directors. Awesome.

Best Movie: Goodfellas (1990)

T

Lars von Trier: Whether or not you think he’s an egotistical Anti-Semitic bastard, that his films are pointless, narcissistic, and hate-driven, you have to admit von Trier is smart, clever and knows how to make a movie. Feel free to disagree, but I freakin love this guy’s films.

Best Movie: Dogville (2003)

U

Edgar G. Ulmer: Sure, he’s only made one or two good films, and you may not recognize his name or even his movies, but he’s a suitable enough choice as any for the letter ‘U.’

Best Film: Detour (1945)

V

Gus Van Sant: Love him or hate him, this is a man whose smarts for the film industry is original and interesting, and who seems to perfectly capture whatever he wants with a camera in a perfectly acceptable (though rarely accessible) manner.

Best Movie: Elephant (2003)

W

Billy Wilder: A man whose excellence has resulted in some of the best movies Hollywood has ever had to offer, Wilder is a talented man that no one will ever forget.

Best Movie: Sunset Blvd. (1950)

X

Xavier Dolan: Though I’ve only seen one of his movies, it was fair enough and he’s deserving of a place here. Besides, how many directors have a name beginning with X?

Best Movie: I Killed My Mother (2009)

Y

Terence Young: His Bond movies weren’t the best, but nevertheless they were still Bond, and decent ones at that. And I must remind you how stressful it is to find directors whose names begin with a certain letter.

Best Movie: Dr. No (1962)

Z

Robert Zemeckis: He’s made some great American movies, ones that will never be forgotten, and he’s a fitting way to end this alphabetical list of 26.

Best Movie: Forrest Gump (1994)

Phew! So that’s my list. Leave a comment below telling me what you thought of it, and what some of your own favourite directors are.

Thanks for reading.

Twenty Five Great Quotes from the Films of Paul Thomas Anderson

Paul Thomas Anderson, as I’m sure you know, is a fantastic director who has made a continuous string of brilliant, extraordinary movies. He’s probably the best American director working in cinema today, and we’re eagerly awaiting more news about the creation of his newest film, The Master. When I heard that he was working on this film, I got so excited I decided to rewatch all his other films in preparation. You can never see a P.T. Anderson movie too many times.

Here are 25 great quotes I picked up from his five movies. Enjoy.

Sydney (1996)

1: “If you stay here, you don’t wanna get caught, okay? We’re talking about kidnapping, extortion, other things, I dunno what. But not good things.”

2: “I know three kinds of karate: jujitsu, aikido, and regular karate.”

3: “I have the money to give you right now, in this moment. I will give you all that I have. Maybe before you were gonna kill me. Maybe. I don’t know. I know John, and I love him like he was my own child. But I can tell you this: I don’t want to die. I killed his father. I can tell you what it was. This is not an excuse. I’m not begging for clemency. All that matters, I do not wish to sacrifice my life for John’s well-being. But I will sacrifice this money for mine because you have asked me. Because after this, I will have done all I can for John and for myself. I’m going to ask you with all the heart and sincerety that I have, please do not put a bullet in me. And, please, don’t tell John what I’ve done. I trust that once I gave you this money, you and I will take separate paths and that this negotiation will settle everything. That is my hope. I don’t wanna die.”

4: “I know some things about Atlantic city…”

5: “This is a very fucked up situation.”

Boogie Nights (1997)

6: “I got a feeling that behind those jeans is something wonderful just waiting to get out.”

7: “I’m ready to shoot right now!”

8: “If it looks like shit, and it sounds like shit, it must be shit!”

9: “I’m gonna keep trying if you guys keep trying. Let’s keep rocking and rolling.”

10: “I’m a star. I’m a star, I’m a star, I’m a star. I’m a big, bright shining star. That’s right.”

Magnolia (1999)

11: “These strange things happen all the time.”

12: “And the book says, ‘we may be through with the past, but the past ain’t through with us.'”

13: “I’m quietly judging you.”

14: “The biggest regret of my life… I let my love go.”

15: “Don’t go away, you fucking asshole, don’t go away, you fucking asshole, don’t go away….”

Punch-Drunk Love (2002)

16: “I don’t like myself sometimes.”

17: “I didn’t do anything. I’m a nice man. I mind my own business. So you tell me ‘that’s that’ before I beat the hell from you. I have so much strength in me you have no idea. I have a love in my life. It makes me stronger than anything you can imagine. I would say ‘that’s that’, Mattress Man.”

18: “I’m lookin’ at your face and I just wanna smash it. I just wanna fuckin’ smash it with a sledgehammer and squeeze it. You’re so pretty.”

19: “Healthy Choice and American Airlines got together and put this promotion: If you buy any 10 Healthy Choice products, they will reward you with 500 frequent flier miles; with this special coupon, they’ll up it to 1,000 miles. So, I think they are trying to push their teriyaki chicken which is $1.79, but I went to the supermarket and I looked around and I saw that they had pudding… for 25¢ a cup… comes in packages of four. But insanely… the barcodes… are on the individual cups! So, quarter a cup, say you bought $2.50 worth. That’s worth 500… with the coupon it’s 1,000 miles. It’s a marketing mistake but I’m taking advantage of it. If you were to spend $3,000, that would get you a million frequent flier miles. You would never have to pay for a ticket the rest of your life.”

20: “Yes-that-would-be-great-but-I’m-not-exactly-sure-I-have-so-much-going-on-here-a-lot-depends-on-this-thing-if-it-happens-I-won’t-be-able-to-go-but-if-it-doesn’t-happen-I-might-be-able-to… I probably won’t though.”

There Will Be Blood (2007)

21: “There are times when I look at people and see nothing worth liking.”

22: “One night, I’m going to come to you, inside your house, wherever you’re sleeping, and I’m going to cut your throat.”

23: “DRAAAAAAAIIIIIIIIIIINNNNAAAGGGEEEE!!!!”

24: “I told you I would eat you!”

25: “I’m finished.”

There are so many more I could list than the above 25, especially from Magnolia and There Will Be Blood (in fact, the whole final scene of the latter film could be easily and appropriately quotable), but I’ll leave that up to you.

Leave a comment with what you thought of my selections, and list some quotes of your own. What directors do you find easily quotable? What do you think of Paul Thomas Anderson’s films? Let me know.

Thanks for reading.

5 Memorable Opening Shots in Movies

When I watch movies, I often look for great opening shots. These are the first things we see when the camera fades in from black and the film begins. A good director will often make a good opening shot to hook the viewer into the film, and here are five of my favourites, in no particular order:

Caché (2005)

The film opens with a deceptively simple stationary shot of the house of a wealthy French couple and their son. We soon release, in a perfectly Michael Haneke manner, that this is a videotape of their house recorded by an unknown person/s, who have then mailed the recording to the couple. A fantastic film which opens in an excellent manner.

Somewhere (2010)

Sofia Coppola’s newest film, and undoubtedly her best, is the excellent indie drama Somewhere. It opens with one of my favourite shots of all time, a shot quite similar to the opening of The Brown Bunny, except this shot is stationary and unmoving, a wise decision. If you find this boring and meaningless, then I suggest you watch the whole movie. If, after that, you still find it boring and meaningless… I’m sorry, but I can’t help you.

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)

Oh, wow. Who could forget that awesome movie, 2001: A Space Odyssey? Obviously, a lot of people, as I was the only one in my family who didn’t doze off while the movie played on when I watched it when I was twelve after Stanley Kubrick died. From this magnificently epic opening shot and onwards, it catapulted my life into a realm of film and cinema. It’s so simplistic, yet so beautiful:

Boogie Nights (1997)

Steadicam, how do I love thee? Let me count the ways… Boogie Nights is easily number one. The opening shot actually really made me feel like I was cruising around the disco, checking out all the funky characters. Everything about it is perfect; the timing, the way it moves so rhythmically, and how awesome the seventies looked through the eyes of Paul Thomas Anderson.

Eyes Wide Shut (1999)

Unfortunately, I couldn’t find a video for this, which is sad, because the music is absolutely perfect in this scene, but let me cut it down to the bare basics. This is Stanley Kubrick being cheeky, which is something we very rarely get from the director, and is what makes the opening so unique. No one knew how to get an audience’s attention like Kubrick:

Now it’s time for…

Leave a comment with what you thought of my five choices, and name some of your own.

Thanks for reading.

The Single Greatest Scene in Film History. Ever.

As hyperbolic as the title of this post may seem, in my opinion the film scene I’m about to present to you lives up to that statement completely. I was going to do a list of the Top Ten Greatest Scenes in Film History, but when I sat down to do a list I realized there were SO many that it was impossible to cut it down to ten. I’ll keep trying, but for now here is The Single Greatest Scene in Film History. Ever. The movie is There Will Be Blood, and this is the haunting final fifteen minutes. If you haven’t seen the film, please watch the whole movie now. Please. You will not regret it, and hopefully you will agree and understand the importance and brilliance of this scene. For those who have seen the film, here’s another chance to recapture the raw emotion and brilliance delivered by Daniel Day-Lewis, who does more in his performance than any other actor could ever hope to achieve. Draaaaaaiiiiiiinaaage, Eli, you boy!

So, what I want to know is… what’s your opinion? Leave a comment on what you thought of my choice and tell me what you consider to be the greatest scene/s in movie history.

Thanks for reading.